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Explorations & Explorers

Across the Ocean

The story of the exploration and settlement of the worlds' largest ocean by seafaring navigators is one of the world’s truly epic tales of human migration.

The successful attempt by a highly resourceful group of mariners remains an inspiring story to Pacific islanders, historians, researchers and the public. 

Utilizing a Neolithic tool kit made of stone adzes and shell abraders, these Oceanic settlers shaped and constructed sophisticated seagoing canoes from the limited natural resources of island environments.

They lashed parts together with cordage made from plant fiber and sailed over the oceans on canoes powered by sails made of plaited leaves.

These highly capable voyagers searched for and colonized islands separated in some instances by over 2,000 nautical miles of open ocean. 

The physical and archeological evidence records the movement of exceptionally skilled navigators and a remarkably adaptable people. 

Connecting the generations

The ‘Imiloa experience connects you to the powerful stories of these ancient mariners as it is told through the voices of a new generation of explorers and navigators. Like their ancestors, in losing the sight of land they discovered the stars. 

At ‘Imiloa, the story of exploration lives on.

‘Imiloa, in collaboration with the Exploratorium: the museum of science, art and human perception in San Francisco, CA., served as a reference for the Exploratorium's Never Lost Polynesian Navigation Site. Visit this site for more on Polynesian Navigation.